Andy Warhol and More

An Andy Warhol exhibit was part of a recent exciting and exhausting trip to St. Louis, Mo, my hometown. There is something about returning to my place of birth and growth as a youngster that tends to ground me and bring me back to how I came to be who I am.  This trip I brought my one and only main squeeze with me. We are thinking about relo-ing there, at least on a part time basis, and I wanted him to get a better feel for the city and the surrounding areas. Also, we are beginning a big birthday celebration and wanted to take in a Cubs-Cardinals  baseball game. (Cubs won so he was happy.) And then of course we spent considerable time with family, which is a part of the grounding process. I am fortunate I come from a big family and we all get along, despite our differences.

Although I didn’t take any photos while I was there, we did manage to squeeze in a trip to an art museum associated with St. Louis University for a little inspiration.  An exhibit of Andy Warhol’s Polaroids were the initially attraction, but in reality the other exhibits were somewhat more impressive. One artist that struck me was, Brother Mel Meyer, a Marianist monk. Now Brother Mel apparently is quite known in St Louis. For 60 years he has been studying and making art in a variety of mediums along with period of  teaching in his earlier years. He is known for his watercolors, acrylics and stain glass to name a few mediums, but what really excited me was Brother Mel’s metal sculptures. He incorporates many unique components, shapes and shades of color  to create captivating and intriguing works of art.  I will have to visit his studio next time in St. Louis.  Here is a link to his website.

Visit my website Susan McAnany Photography to view my work.

Graffiti Galore

I have had an infatuation with graffiti art for some time. For me there is something very liberating and rebellious about finding a public place and making art,  knowing it will probably be around for only a very limited time. Usually it is either painted over by authorities or often another graffiti artist.

I also admire the skill and vision that must be  involved to paint some very elaborate designs with a can of spray paint. No pencil sketches allowed. My first exposure to spray paint art was in my teens when a friend offered to paint a wall in my bedroom with a face of one of my favorite rock stars, Frank Zappa, using neon spray paint. Cool idea. Needless to say, my mother was not too thrilled, but she did allow me to keep it. I think even she recognized it as a form of art.

Graffiti art can vary from simplistic designs such as the Skippy Girls in Australia to the mayhem I recently photographed in Philadelphia. Sometimes the artist is conveying a message, either political, social or gang related, other times it can be terrific mural. Generally, they are tagged, which is the artist’s signature.  All are impressive and I stop to view and photograph when ever possible. Enjoy the graffiti images below and if interested in seeing more please visit my website,  Susan McAnany Photography.

The Darlings of Darlington, Australia

Darlings of Darlington Graffiti Art
Graffiti Wall In St. Louis, Mo
Graffiti wall in St Louis
Religious, Gang or Political Message?
graffiti art photograph sea life
Social Related Message
just divorced graffiti art photograph
Graffiti Underground, Philadelphia, PA
photograph of graffiti underground in Philadelphia
 Images ©2003-2012  Susan M. McAnany – All Rights are Reserved.
More graffiti images can be viewed on my website www.susanmcanany.com in the Projects Portfolio.