Printing Computer Screenshots – The Easy Way to Print a Screen on an Apple Computer

Ever want to print data off a website without all of their header, footer, etc information or maybe a complete webpage or open web pages on your desktop. Well, if you use an Apple computer,  below are a couple of different ways of printing computer screenshots:

1) To select specific areas of the screen, press the CMD/SHIFT/4 keys and you will get a cross hair on your screen. Use your mouse or Wacom to select the area you would like to to print. When you release the click, your selection will be captured to a file on your desktop. You can then send the file to the printer.

2) To print all web pages open on your monitor use CMD/SHIFT/3. Again it will generate a file on your desktop to be sent to the printer.

3) To print one web page of multiple pages open on your desktop press CMD/SHIFT/4, and spacebar. A small camera icon appears that allows you to select which page to send to a file on your desktop. Just send that file to your printer.

Personally, I find the first option most useful when printing computer screeshots and happy to share this information.

To view more of my work, please visit www.susanmcanany.com.


Adobe Photoshop Blending Modes Shortcut Key

Toggling through Adobe Photoshop Blending Modes using a shortcut key is very useful and easy to do.  Here lately, I have been making a conscious effort to streamline some of my keystrokes while working in Adobe Photoshop by using the shortcut keys Photoshop offers and also programing my Wacom Intuos 4. I must admit it has helped. Not only is it helping with speeding up repetitive key stokes but also with my body mechanics on the computer.  One shortcut key that I have found particularly useful is for changing Photoshop Blending Modes in the Layers Palette. I often find I do an edit on a New Layer, but the Normal Blending Mode just doesn’t look right. By toggling thru the various different Photoshop Blending Modes, my art takes on a different look. To utilize this function, first select the Move Tool (first one on the Photoshop Toolbar), then press the Shift and + (plus) key to toggle through all of the different blending modes. You can also use the Shift and – (minus) key to reverse the order.

There are many shortcut keys preassigned in Photoshop. You can do a quick search on the internet to find a list. In Adobe Photoshop you can also go to Edit>Assign Shortcut Keys to view or change any shortcut key. It is one of those administrative tasks that does pay off with saving time during the editing stage of your images.

Happy Editing!

More of my work can be viewed on my website, Susan McAnany Photography.


Color Profiles Revisited

I just got back from a workshop where the topic of Color Profiles came up and light bulb went off in my brain. Maybe that is why learning is called enlightenment.  Back to the subject of profiles; the ones I have most often have used are sRGB and Adobe RGB (1998).  At the workshop ProPhoto RGB was discussed and recommended for photographic images.

Just what is a Color Profile you may be asking.  It is a set of numbers (data) that allows you to define characteristics of how color on a device will be handled and /or the range of colors that will be displayed or printed. It is an important aspect of color management and an integral part of displaying or printing your imagery.  Below lists some of the main color profiles we use today along with information on when to use them.

sRGB is probably the most widely known and used profile with the most limited color range. It is my understanding most browser (but not all) on the internet display images in this profile. If you ever upload an image to the web without that color profile your work may look rather dull or muted.

Adobe RGB (1998) displays a wider color gamut than sRGB and is often the industry standard for printers and displays.  This is the profile I have historically assigned to my images.

ProPhoto RGB color space was originally developed by Kodak and also known as ROMM RGB.  It offers a very large gamut of color range and capable of capturing more detail especially in saturated colors. It does have its drawbacks though and appropriate for use on 16 bit files only. It is not recommended for 8 bit images.

My workflow is to capture in RAW, where no color profile is assigned yet. I process using Adobe Bridge and in ACR will be now assigning ProPhoto RGB during that process. Prior to printing, I will be converting to Adobe RGB and prior to uploading anything to the web I will be converting to sRGB. The theory it is best to capture and store the widest color possible, especially with the rapid development in technology. This way you have the data for the future when the technology is here.

Thanks for reading and check out my work at www.susanmcanany.com.

 


Chromatic Aberration Removal

Sometimes Chromatic Aberration is noticeable on an image and a technique is needed for Chromatic Aberration Removal.  You may be asking what is Chromatic Aberration, so let me explain.  It is often found in images where there is an extreme contrast between the light and dark colors and/or highlight and shadows. The dynamic range and sensors on most cameras  just cannot record the two extremes, thus purple fringing occurs or sometime it comes in the form of green or red contamination on the darker color.

Here is a great technique I stumbled upon today to remove Chromatic Aberration using Photoshop CS5.

Here is one method for removing chromatic aberration:

1) Open the image in Photoshop CS5 and copy the Background Layer (CMD-J).

2)  Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur.  You can experiment with the amount of pixels here, but I had good luck using 15 pixels.

3)  Change the Blend Mode on the Layer to Color.

4)  Add a Mask to the Layer and then invert the Mask.  (CMD-I)

5) Paint with White to areas where you want to remove the CA. If you apply too much, change to Black and paint to remove.  Also, using the Opacity slider on the brush will help  control the intensity of the filter.

I also read  Lightroom 4 has a great tool to remove CA. I guess I will put that piece of software on my Wish List.

The more I learn about photography,  Photoshop and art the more I find I need and want to learn.

Happy Post Processing!

Visit my website, Susan McAnany Photograpy, to view my work.

Just a quick update to this post. I have used this technique also with Photoshop CS6.

 


Painting With Light Technique

Painting with light is one technique I really enjoy experimenting with. I think I like it so much because I never know exactly what I am going to get. There is definitely a surprise element when you try the technique of painting with light. If you have been following my post, I’m sure you’ve noticed I am always searching for the unusual and like to experiment.

I have been doing some research on the Painting with Light technique and wanted to share my findings and first efforts. The image below was taken in a harbor on Sarasota Bay with the Ringling Bridge in the background on the right.  The mechanics of the process is to place the camera on a tripod and using a slow shutter speed rotate the camera either left and right or up and down. For the image above, I obviously rotated the camera laterally.  The exposure was 1 second at f/22; ISO 100. I was shooting at sunset, which required me to really stop down the aperture. I was wishing my ISO would go to 50, but no such luck just yet with most digital cameras. There is definitely some experimentation required with the shutter speed and this process can be done with speeds as fast as 1/15 of a second. As always, lighting rules and shoot many frames.

“Ringling Bridge” Painting with Light

paint with light technique
Abstract of Ringling Bridge and Sarasota Bay.

View more of my work at www.susanmcanany.com.

Thanks for reading!


Color Profiles

This week I have been wrestling with Color Profiles and Photoshop’s CS5.

Now, my typical workflow is to shoot in RAW, my camera set to Adobe RGB Color Profile.  From what I have read there is a greater color gamut using this profile and my current thought process is more is always better.  My software of choice is  Adobe Bridge, Photoshop’s CS5 along with plugins from Nik and Topaz. I save my files as layered TIFF and prior to uploading to the web, I will re-size, convert to sRGB  and save as jpgs. For some of my  prints, or commercial print projects I often need to convert my files to CMYK.  This workflow has served me well over the last several years.

However, I have just been working on a batch on images and I noticed many of my Tiff files have the sRGB profile as their Working and/or Embedded Color Space.  Initially I wasn’t sure how this happen, thus it motivated me spend time researching more about color profiles.

Now I am by no means a techie person, so I try to decipher things down to simplistic concepts that I can easily remember. Like most photographers I am the happiest behind the camera in my creative zone.  I am however aware of the importance of a calibrated monitor,  printer and selecting correct printer paper profiles and  I do this to the best of my ability. But now I am looking at embedded profiles and working color spaces, what is this all about??

After doing several hours of reading, I found out a few core things that have helped clarify my mind on this subject.

Now we all  know color is defined by numbers and a Color Profile is how color’s numerical value visually appear, however, I didn’t know that a Raw file has no Color Profile and any type of profile is pretty much device specific.

The Working Space defines what color profile is used in the different color models such as RGB and  CMYK. These profiles are specified in the Color Settings Dialog Box in Photoshop (Edit  > Settings) and provides the info for an embedded profile.  Mine was set to sRGB causing the previously mentioned problem.

The Embedded Color Profile is the numeric value a monitor or internet browser uses to display colors and often they display in sRGB, especially the internet.  It is embedded in the image when an image is saved.  The data for the embedded profile comes from either EXIF data captured when your image was taken or what is in your Color Settings Dialog Box in Photoshop if a Raw file is launched into Photoshop without using an interface software program, such as Bridge Camera Raw.

In Photoshop, once you have established your parameters to the Color Settings Dialog Box,  you have the option to use the command Convert To Profile to change an Embedded Color Profile. You can even convert an entire folder easily using the Image Processor. Choose File > Scripts > Image Processor. Another handy tool is the  Assign Profile, which allows you to view how colors in an image will look with a different profile, but this is not an effective way to change an Embedded Profile.

Below is a link to an interesting read about the subject from someone who knows far more than me. I also found some useful information on Adobe’s website.

http://www.computer-darkroom.com/ps12_colour/ps12_1.htm

You can view my work at www.susanmcanany.com. 


The Camera Bag Search

Searching or researching a new camera bag can be both enlightening and a grueling experience.   It seems my gear is continuing to grow and  my shoulders and neck are oh so feeling the pain. Also, I have some trips planned so I thought this might be a good time to invest in a rolling bag designed specifically for camera gear.  After a quick look on line, I realized I better figure out exactly what I am looking for in this bag to be able to narrow down my choice.

Here was my criteria for a camera bag:

1) Had to be a rolling bag.

2) Wanted one I could work out of and did not require laying the bag flat and totally unzipping to access gear.

3) Had to accommodate my computer in addition to camera bodies and lenses.

4) I didn’t want anything too big. The bigger the bag, the more stuff I will shove into it and then I will have problems getting the bag into the overhead compartment on the plane.

5) I wanted some way to attach my tripod.

I had remembered reading something in my NAPP (National Assoc. of Photoshop Professionals) magazine about  “Think Tanks Airstream”. I like those guys and value their opinion. Unfortunately, when I looked at the bag, I realized I would have to totally unzip the bag to retrieve any gear. Also accommodating a computer required purchasing an additional case.

Next, I researched Lowepro and their line of rolling bags. The Pro Roller Attache X50 looked interesting with its two bags in one concept and it had been highly rated in an article I had read. However, after a closer look I realized my camera (a full frame camera) and gear would really be a tight squeeze. The bag was just too small.

I also realized accommodating a tripod with any these bags just wasn’t an option. I guess that goes into checked luggage.

I currently use a Tamrac bag and I like it, but unfortunately their rolling bags just seem to large.  I also looked at several other manufacturers and back packs and was beginning to get a bit discouraged when I remembered about Jill-E Designs camera bags. I currently own one of their  bags and I have always been impressed with their quality and style. Sure enough, there it was, the Large Rolling Bag, and it was love at first sight. A cute, stylish bag with a zipper on top to allow easy access to my camera gear and computer. And best of all, three color choices. I hope it looks as good in person as it does on the internet!

I have to make an update to this post, because unfortunately I had to return the beautiful red Jill-E Bag. It was just a bit too big and heavy for my needs. If however, my need was to wheel a lot of equipment to a location and leave it parked as I worked from the bag, the bag would of been perfect. It was very well made and stylish. Hope this helps!

One last word, what a special day it is; Feb 29. Once every four years we gain an extra day to make art and have fun!

Thanks for reading and more of my work can be viewed at susanmcanany.com.

Macro Mania

Recently I bought a new macro lens to take my photography to a higher creative level. I have to admit the Canon MP-E 65 mm macro lens is a beast I have never encountered before. I call it the mighty macro for it allows a 5:1 close up range, meaning I can photograph something as small as a grain of rice. The lens is not without challenges and certainly test my patience. It is manual focus lens and the depth of field is so shallow, image stacking is required but the creative possibilities are unlimited. Lighting is also a key factor, but I love working in my studio, so I am delighted to have this new tool. Once I master the basics, I plan to produce a series of abstract images, which I can add to my “Misconceptions” Collection or maybe I will start a new series called “Macronanay”.  Below is my first print available using this lens. It is a combination of 10 different photos.

Image shot with MP-E 65

Macro image using Canon's MP E -64
Well Aged by Susan McAnany

To view the print larger or purchase, visit my website:  http://www.susanmcanany.com

As always, thanks for visiting!